Historical Transects

The first set of transect maps show the change in the terrain through history. These transects demonstrate the hardening and diversification of the landscape, from a rice-based agrarian condition in 1911, to an intensification of agriculture mid-century, to the present day landscape in which gated housing, industrial manufacturing plants, malls, and golf courses mingle with older agrarian settlements. The fluid coastal zones have hardened through the introduction of intensive shrimp farming, and other bodies of water, such as Rawa Cipondoh in the middle of the transect, have visibly attenuated.

Contemporary Transects

The second set of transect maps are taken from contemporary representations of Jakarta: a street directory, a government planning map, and a satellite image. All maps are ideological because they represent a lived world from a particular, often dominant, point of view. In this respect maps necessarily exaggerate some features of the city while downplaying or excluding others. The street directory, for example, represents the city of car users, so vast tracts of agricultural terrain and kampung settlements are simply left undescribed. The planning maps offer greater detail, but because they are premised on a developmentalist logic – a developing city – they describe traditional elements of the landscape as 'underdeveloped' or 'disorganized'. The satellite image appears to capture the city just as it is, untainted with ideology. Yet, the satellite image converts a city in flux to a static city. Each of these maps articulates a particular view of the city, but none of them is recognizable by most of the residents of the city. None of these maps have come to terms with the flux and diversity of Jakarta's peri-urban areas. New styles of representing this kind of city are required.

A final, speculative transect, explores the overlapping of various 'cultures' of legibility. It draws upon the detailed interviews conducted in the field. Each of the coloured zones represents a roughly coherent and common understanding of the particular part of the city. Some of these zones extend across large parts of the city reflecting the confidence of the respondents' knowledge of the zone and their capacity to live their daily lives within it. Other zones are smaller and reflect a more fragile foothold in the city. These zones are often tethered to distant parts of Java or the Indonesian archipelago, and represent the patterns of inhabitation of migrant labourers and short-term residents. The significance of this map is that these various cultures of legibility coexist in the city. Sometimes this is merely juxtaposition, other times it is a more complex pattern of overlapping and interpenetration.

Kronologi

The second set of transect maps are taken from contemporary representations of Jakarta: a street directory, a government planning map, and a satellite image. All maps are ideological because they represent a lived world from a particular, often dominant, point of view. In this respect maps necessarily exaggerate some features of the city while downplaying or excluding others. The street directory, for example, represents the city of car users, so vast tracts of agricultural terrain and kampung settlements are simply left undescribed. The planning maps offer greater detail, but because they are premised on a developmentalist logic – a developing city – they describe traditional elements of the landscape as 'underdeveloped' or 'disorganized'. The satellite image appears to capture the city just as it is, untainted with ideology. Yet, the satellite image converts a city in flux to a static city. Each of these maps articulates a particular view of the city, but none of them is recognizable by most of the residents of the city. None of these maps have come to terms with the flux and diversity of Jakarta's peri-urban areas. New styles of representing this kind of city are required.

A final, speculative transect, explores the overlapping of various 'cultures' of legibility. It draws upon the detailed interviews conducted in the field. Each of the coloured zones represents a roughly coherent and common understanding of the particular part of the city. Some of these zones extend across large parts of the city reflecting the confidence of the respondents' knowledge of the zone and their capacity to live their daily lives within it. Other zones are smaller and reflect a more fragile foothold in the city. These zones are often tethered to distant parts of Java or the Indonesian archipelago, and represent the patterns of inhabitation of migrant labourers and short-term residents. The significance of this map is that these various cultures of legibility coexist in the city. Sometimes this is merely juxtaposition, other times it is a more complex pattern of overlapping and interpenetration.

Data Analysis

The second set of transect maps are taken from contemporary representations of Jakarta: a street directory, a government planning map, and a satellite image. All maps are ideological because they represent a lived world from a particular, often dominant, point of view. In this respect maps necessarily exaggerate some features of the city while downplaying or excluding others. The street directory, for example, represents the city of car users, so vast tracts of agricultural terrain and kampung settlements are simply left undescribed. The planning maps offer greater detail, but because they are premised on a developmentalist logic – a developing city – they describe traditional elements of the landscape as 'underdeveloped' or 'disorganized'. The satellite image appears to capture the city just as it is, untainted with ideology. Yet, the satellite image converts a city in flux to a static city. Each of these maps articulates a particular view of the city, but none of them is recognizable by most of the residents of the city. None of these maps have come to terms with the flux and diversity of Jakarta's peri-urban areas. New styles of representing this kind of city are required.

A final, speculative transect, explores the overlapping of various 'cultures' of legibility. It draws upon the detailed interviews conducted in the field. Each of the coloured zones represents a roughly coherent and common understanding of the particular part of the city. Some of these zones extend across large parts of the city reflecting the confidence of the respondents' knowledge of the zone and their capacity to live their daily lives within it. Other zones are smaller and reflect a more fragile foothold in the city. These zones are often tethered to distant parts of Java or the Indonesian archipelago, and represent the patterns of inhabitation of migrant labourers and short-term residents. The significance of this map is that these various cultures of legibility coexist in the city. Sometimes this is merely juxtaposition, other times it is a more complex pattern of overlapping and interpenetration.

Interviews

The project involved a large team of researchers from the University of Edinburgh and Universitas Indonesia, in Jakarta, who undertook field interviews with residents of the peri-urban transect. The interviews focussed on territorial knowledge, transit routes, social networks, reciprocal relationships and daily routines. Individual territorial maps were produced from each interview and relocated back into the transect. Collectively, these maps generated an image of the city that is configured by patches of known and familiar urban terrain, and paths and routes that link them.